Control unwanted calories when eating out to control weight

Calorie Control Means Weight Control When Eating Out

USE THESE 10 TIPS TO KEEP UNWANTED CALORIES OUT OF YOUR DIET WHEN EATING OUT

Eating out is no longer just for special occasions. For many, eating in restaurants is a means to survival. But with it come all those extra calories from larger portions, hidden ingredients and menu temptations that can wreak havoc on any diet.

If you are trying to control your weight, you’ve got to control those extra calories when eating out. This doesn’t mean you should only order broiled fish and undressed salad. To control unwanted calories you’ve got to control the situation.

Here are 10 Tips for Calorie Control When Eating Out that put you in charge.

  1. Choose wisely when deciding where to eat so you know in advance what’s on the menu.
  2. Decide what you want to eat before looking at the menu to avoid being distracted by tempting choices.
  3. Don’t arrive famished, it’s much harder to resist temptation.
  4. Refuse the complementary bread, tortillas or fried noodles if offered.
  5. Don’t be shy. Ask how things are prepared and request what you want – you’re paying the bill.
  6. Skip the shared appetizers and just pass them along if they weren’t what you ordered.
  7. Listen to your stomach. When you start to feel satisfied, STOP eating and pack up the unfinished food for another meal.
  8. Beware of the effects of alcohol. Cocktails contain calories AND impair your judgment about how much you’re eating.
  9. Fit the meal into your day by making adjustments at other meals so you have room for some of the extras calories.
  10. Remember, there is always tomorrow. When everything just looks too good to pass by, plan a return visit for another meal.

How will you be controlling calories on your next meal out?

): Sugar and sweeteners can be part of healthy diet

Sugar or Sweetener – Which is Best?

Both sugar and artificial sweeteners can have a place in a healthy diet

They’re the foods and beverages we love to hate – anything that tastes sweet. We love them because they satisfy one of our most primal appetites. We hate them because it’s so easy to consume too much of them, or to eat and drink sweet tasting things instead of the other less tasty stuff.

But is that really a sugar/sweetener problem or one of portion control? Take a look at my post on portion control and evidence below, then decide.

Sugar is Natural

The Food and Drug Administration allows food manufacturers to describe foods as natural if they do not contain added color, artificial flavors or synthetic substances. Both sugar and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) meet those criteria. The both come from plants and undergo less processing than what it takes to turn milk into cheese.

Once sugar, HFCS or a naturally sweet piece of fruit is eaten, they are broken down into the exact same simple sugars. Your body cannot tell where they came from and uses them all in the same way. And although fruit does have other nutrients in it along with the sugar it contains, the sugar is there for a reason. It helped us select the ripest, and consequently, most nutritious fruits when we were foraging for our food, and that contributed to our evolutionary success as a species.

Flash forward to the 21st Century and sugar is no longer hard to come by or only found in fruit. That makes it easy for some people eat too much of it, but that does not mean sugar or HFCS is bad for us. Too much is not good, and that’s true about everything as I wrote in my blog, There are No junk Foods.

And what about the alternative to sugar and HFCS, artificial sweeteners?

Sweeteners Are Safe

Low and no calorie sugar substitutes have been available for over 50 years. Saccharin was the first, and each new sweetener discovered since then has undergone more extensive study than any other additive in the food supply.

Still, the suspicions linger on.

The weight of the research sides with the sweeteners. Not only is there no scientific evidence that they are harmful or increase our appetite, they can actually play a role in weight and blood glucose control when used as part of an energy balanced diet. Of course, some people use a lot of them who do not have balanced diets, but are the sweeteners to blame?

According to international experts, the answer is no. The safety of the low and no calorie sweeteners on the market today has been endorsed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the World Health Organization, the Scientific Committee for Food of the European Union and the regulatory agencies for more than 100 countries. Could they all be wrong?

Position Statements in support of these sweeteners have also been issued by groups including the American Diabetes Association, American Medical Association, American Dietetic Association, American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Cancer Society to name a few. Are they all misleading the public?

You decide. Are sugars and sweeteners the problem, or do some people have a problem with them?

Daily protein requirements can come from plant and animal sources.

Getting Enough Protein From the Foods You Eat

Protein is available from plant and animal sources

If you read my November 4, 2011 post, Protein in the Diet – How Much is Enough?, then you should have a good idea of how many grams of protein a day you need at your current age, level of activity and state of health. Now let’s see how you can make the best food choices to deliver those 50-150 grams of protein a day.

What foods provide the best protein?

That’s really a trick question since all sources of protein are equally beneficial to the body. It was once believed that the protein from animal sources was better because it contains all of the essential amino acids, but that myth has been laid to rest. Protein from both plants and animals provide everything we need to stay healthy as long as we eat enough of it. And there is no need to combine certain foods at a meal to create “complete proteins,” either. Your body collects all of the amino acids from all of the food you eat so it can recombine them to make the new proteins you need.

How much protein is in a serving?

This is where it helps to know what the standard serving sizes look like for foods in each food group. ChooseMYPlate.gov provides detailed explanations of that. Using those serving sizes and the number of servings per day recommended in the 2000 calorie/day food plan in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, here’s where your protein would come from:

Daily Servings/Food Group Grams of Protein

2 cups Fruit 0 – 2

2 ½ cups Vegetables 4 – 8

6 oz. Grains 12 – 18

5 ½ oz. Meat, Beans, Nuts 32 – 38

3 cups Dairy 24

TOTAL PROTEIN 72 – 90 grams

The ranges vary for each group since some foods are higher in protein than others within each group. But worth noting is that if you choose the higher protein foods from the vegetable and grain groups you can get as many as 26 grams of protein a day from those sources in your diet.

You can also include more plant proteins by selecting the beans, nuts and seeds options from the “meat” group. Doing so gives you all the other benefits they come packaged with, like fiber and phytonutrients, without the saturated fat and cholesterol that comes with the protein found in most animal foods.

Bottom line: You do not have to count on just the meat and dairy foods to get all the protein you need.

Serving size on food label holds a key to weight control.

Serving Size, Portion Size and Body Size Are Connected

Learn how to estimate portion sizes using serving sizes on food labels

No matter how nutritious a food is, you still need to control the portion size to make it part of a portion size balanced diet. Or as the saying goes, too much of a good thing is not always good! The same holds true in reverse – a little bit of (almost) anything won’t kill you.

Knowing the amounts for everything you eat is your ticket to knowing things like how many calories you are consuming – an essential factor in weight control – and how many of the recommended servings you’ve had from each food group – a key to following the Dietary Guidelines. So as important as it is to your health to select the right foods to eat, it is equally important to know how to dish them out.

First some background.

The “serving size” that appears on the Nutrition Facts panel of a food label is based on government regulations established for food manufacturers. The intent was to have similar foods use the same serving size for their nutrition information so it would be easier for consumers to compare products.

It does not mean that it is the suggested amount to eat, although the government did base them on the average amount of each food usually eaten at one time.

The “portion size” is the amount you actually eat of a given food or beverage. So if you take a bit more or less than the serving size listed on a food label, that is your portion. The same is true when eating in a restaurant. They can dish it out anyway they want, but you get to decide how much of it you eat.

If you want to know how much you eat, you need to learn the basics about serving sizes so you can better estimate your portion sizes. Follow these Six Steps to get it right.

Six Steps to Sizing Up What You Eat

  1. Determine the capacity of the cups and bowls you normally use at home by filling them with water then transferring the water to a measuring cup. Measure the diameter of the plates with a ruler.
  2. Use measuring cups and spoons or a food scale for one week to measure and/or weigh everything you eat at home using the serving sizes given on the food labels to see what those amounts look like.
  3. Put the measured servings in the cups, bowls and plates you normally use to see how much space each food occupies relative to the size of the container.
  4. Compare the measured amounts of each food to a common object to create a visual reminder of each serving size. Common examples are to compare the amount to the size of a computer mouse, DVD, lipstick, bar of soap, golf ball, dollar bill or palm of your hand.
  5. Look at the cups, bowls and plates when you eat out to see if they are bigger or smaller than the ones you use at home.
  6. Estimate the total amount of each food served to you when eating out so you can decide how much more or less that is from the measured serving sizes.

Knowing how much you eat matters for a healthy diet and healthy body weight. What have you got to lose?

Junk food not the problem, imbalanced food choices are.

Guess What? There Are No Junk Foods!

5 Simple Truths help avoid the junk food mindset

It’s the catch-all phrase used to describe anything edible that’s blamed for the rising rates of chronic disease and obesity in this country, but what exactly is junk food? Given the frequency the term is used, I’ve never heard a satisfactory definition of junk food, or the criteria for labeling a food or beverage as such, that can help people make eating decisions.

Maybe we need a food group for junk foods to know which ones they are and how many servings a day we can have?

Some people say junk foods provide empty calories, or ingredients that are unhealthy, or are overly processed. Well that implies everything we eat is supposed to be full of nutrients. Ever look at the nutrition facts for iceberg lettuce? It’s pretty empty. And what about nutritious foods, like eggs, that also happen to have a lot of something in them that isn’t so good for us, like cholesterol. Are eggs a junk food? What if we eat something just because it tastes good. Should chocolate chip cookies be banned?

Blaming individual foods, beverages and ingredients for what’s wrong with our health and trying to ban certain foods as a way to fix the problem just doesn’t make sense. And it doesn’t work, either. First, there is simply no way we could ever make a definitive list of all “junk foods”, and even if we did, thousands of new food items enter the marketplace every year making “the list” obsolete very quickly. Second, people eat for many reasons, not just to meet their nutritional needs. Celebrations, rituals and traditions of all sorts are based on eating certain foods, and that is an important part of every culture.

So if you’re still trying to figure out if something belongs on the junk food list du jour, here are 5 Simple Truths to help you put it all into perspective:

  1. No food is bad for you unless the food is bad – as in unfit to eat. It’s the quality of your total diet – everything you eat and drink throughout the days, weeks, months and years of your life – that determines your nutritional well-being. (Exceptions apply for those with diseases or allergies for which special foods must be consumed or avoided.)
  2. There are no fattening foods or foods that make you gain weight. The calories in everything we eat are all equally available to be used as energy or stored as fat if not used. Some calories come packaged in foods with many other nutrients, but if we eat more of them than we need, the nutrients will not make us healthier, but the calories will make us fatter.
  3. There is no perfect diet, or diet plan. Instead of shopping around for the next best diet, start paying attention to what you now eat and how that stacks up against the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Then you can begin to fix your diet one food group at a time using ChooseMyPlate.gov.
  4. People come in different sizes and so should their food. There is no one serving size that’s right for all of us, so don’t count on that food label to tell you how much you should eat. The serving size listed on packages is just a reference amount for the rest of the nutrition information found on the label. Eating too much of something that’s good for you is a much bigger problem than eating a little bit of something that isn’t.
  5. Hypocrisy is the worst nutrition message parents and other care-givers can deliver to children. It sounds like this: “No you can’t have that junk food, it’s not good for you,” one day and then, “You can have that junk food because it’s your birthday, a holiday, we’re on vacation…” on another. It’s far better to teach them how to enjoy all foods in moderation and set a good example for how to do it, one chocolate chip cookie at a time.